MCAV young members awarded scholarships to Queensland fire workshop

MCAV young members awarded scholarships to  Queensland fire workshop

Traditional burning methods were featured at the National Indigenous Fire Workshop at Melsonby in Far North Queensland. These workshops are attracting widespread interest throughout Australia.


Celebrating the return of Traditional Burning

Celebrating the return of Traditional Burning

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio today joined Aboriginal Elders from the Dja Dja Wurrung community to hold a ceremony...


Traditional Burning of our High Country

Traditional Burning of our High Country

Members of the MCAV have always understood the benefits of frequent, low intensity (cool) mosaic burns. The Mountain Cattlemen adopted firestick management from the Aborigines, a practice used by the Indigenous people .


Mountain Cattlemen Support Indigenous Firestick Program

Mountain Cattlemen Support Indigenous Firestick Program

Representatives of the Mountain Cattlemen attended an indigenous fire presentation on Monday May 15 in a show of support for the promotion of the traditional methods of fuel reduction burning throughout Australia


Yarner Edition 24

Yarner Edition 24

NEW BOOKS RECOMMENDED

Fire Stick Ecology  by Vic Jurskis is now available from MCAV $30 plus postage, or pick up a copy at the Get Together. Fire Stick Ecology is fair dinkum science, written in plain English. 


Traditional Burning Support

This is an extract from the MCAV central Council meeting held May 2017

MOTION regarding support for the indigenous burning project.

Moved Chris Commins    
Seconded  Ben Treasure

I MOVE THAT  The MCAV fully supports the Indigenous Firestick program. Further, we recognise the land management connection between the early Cattlemen and the Aborigines. We acknowledge the ancient fire techniques used by the aborigines were successfully adapted by the early cattlemen.

Carried unanamously

Victor Steffensen inspects the bush in the Kinglake rangesTraditional Burning

Traditionally Mountain Cattlemen and their families carefully burnt sections of their High Country leases each year in the autumn until stopped by the authorities many years ago.

This practice reduced fuel loads which in turn reduced the intensity of bushfires and encouraged sweet new grass which didn’t carry fire the next season.

Deliberate burning of the land and the bush was being done regularly by the first people before European settlement as identified by Prof Bill Gammage. The early settlers and Cattlemen continued the practice until stopped.

From that point, the health of the High Country deteriorated until now where recently it was identified by Indigenous fire expert Victor Steffensen as “sick”.  The ill health of the land due to poor management   is a very concerning situation that the Cattlemen have been attempting to explain to successive Governments for forty years without much success. The MCAV is delighted that attention is now being paid to the indigenous people’s fire program and to the value of cool burning.